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Study Abroad Opportunities

See the world and earn credit towards your degree while you're doing it! With programs available in France, Italy, England, Costa Rica, and more, you can immerse yourself in new cultures and learn more than you ever expected.

Learn more about Study Abroad at UL Lafayette.

Criminal Justice Abroad

Two courses are currently being developed for Summer 2017. Please check back to this page for updates in the future or contact Dr. Stearns at stearns@louisiana.edu.

CJUS 399: Jack the Ripper and Friends: Victorian England’s Serial Killers

This course will introduce students to the social, cultural, and economic context of Jack the Ripper’s Victorian England. Students will gain a greater understanding of the way in which class struggles, modernization, immigration, sexuality, and religion played a role not only in the killings, but also in the frenzy of media attention and mass panic that surrounded Jack the Ripper’s activities. We will visit the National Archives to see the Ripper’s letters, tour the Whitechapel district where Jack the Ripper found his victims, contextualize the murders by visiting the past at the Museum of London, and honor victim Mary Kelly at St. Patrick’s Cemetery. We will explore the genderized aspect that characterizes nearly all serial killer crimes by touring the Jack the Ripper museum, which is dedicated to the women killed by the Ripper. Students will also examine other, less well-known atrocities, making the most of our England location to examine the sensational Victorian “Brides in the Bath” murders, the Bermondsey Horror, and more. Students will become familiar with the methodology of content analysis, as we critically analyze historical newspaper accounts of Victorian-era serial killers to theorize about the intrinsic fears that lie under the surface of mass panics. We will also explore a variety of explanations for the long-term fascination with Jack the Ripper’s crimes.

Week before England: Students will attend lectures, complete reading assignments, and participate in discussion groups to familiarize themselves with Victorian England and the crimes in particular. We will also hold viewings of the BBC drama, “Ripper Street,” and read The Victorian Underground to further ground our study of serial crime in England during the late 1800s. Reaction papers will be assigned.

Weeks in England: Content will be delivered mainly via field walks. Students will be expected to complete field journals/blogs, write essays, and deliver presentations while in England.

After England: Infographics and a field journal summary paper will be due some weeks after the return to Louisiana.

After England/honors: Honors students will be expected to complete all assignments in addition to a 10 to 15-page research paper some weeks after the return to Louisiana.

Prerequisites: permission of instructor. (Students are encouraged, but not limited, to enroll in two courses taught by the same instructor.  This will allow students to maximize their learning experience and prevent students from having conflicting class schedules.)

CJUS 399: Bobbies and Billy Clubs: The U.K. Criminal Justice System

This course focuses on the U.K.’s historical and modern criminal justice system and the important ways in which it has influenced the U.S.’s system. We will make the most of our London location to tease out the political, cultural, and social reasons for the U.K.’s unique responses to crime. Britain ranks 16th in terms of incarcerating its population (far behind the United States’ high rate of incarceration) and public confidence in the criminal justice system is rising. There is no death penalty and the majority of law enforcement personnel does not carry firearms. Students will investigate the reasons behind these aspects of British culture as we analyze literature, view artwork, and participate in field trips. Excursions will include tours of infamous prisons and Scotland Yard. We will also visit Magistrates’ Courts, the Crown Courts, The Home Office, The Tower of London, the Clink Prison Museum, the Crime Museum (Museum of London), the City of London Police Museum, the London Dungeon, and the famous courtroom, “Old Bailey.”

We will discover original paintings by currently incarcerated individuals exhibited at the Koestler Arts Centre in London

Students will be encouraged to consider the philosophical framework of social control  encouraging U.K.’s citizens to lead non-violent lives by reading Thomas More’s 1615 book Utopia and Elizabeth Fry’s 1820 book Prisons in Scotland and the North of England. In addition, the CCTV phenomenon will be analyzed through the lens of George Orwell’s 1984.

Students can also expect to engage with various local law enforcement agencies, practicing attorneys, and correctional facilities, as well as coming to a greater understanding of British culture and public opinion in general.

Week before England: Students will attend lectures, complete reading assignments, and participate in discussion groups to familiarize themselves with the United Kingdom’s criminal justice system. Reaction papers will be assigned.

Weeks in England: Content will be delivered mainly via field walks. Students will be expected to complete field journals/blogs, write essays, and deliver presentations while in England. We will also be reading British crime fiction featuring modern Scotland Yard detectives while in England, including Elizabeth George’s A Great Deliverance and P.D. James’ Cover Her Face.

After England: Infographics and a field journal summary paper will be due some weeks after the return to Louisiana.

After England/honors: Honors students will be expected to complete all assignments in addition to a 10 to 15-page research paper some weeks after the return to Louisiana.

Prerequisites: permission of instructor. (Students are encouraged, but not limited, to enroll in two courses taught by the same instructor.  This will allow students to maximize their learning experience and prevent students from having conflicting class schedules.)